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Agriculture and Gardening
Agriculture and Gardening
18 members
2 questions
15 posts

Discussion

Regenerative Agriculture Forum this Friday and Saturday

Win-win-win: Climate, Health, Profit

How often do we come across a win-win-win situation? Let’s celebrate it whenever it happens! Here’s a big one: Regenerative Agriculture.

Too often, doing something good means, SACRIFICE (frowny face). “No, you can’t eat that, it’s bad for you.” “Finish your homework.” “Take the bus instead of driving.” “Buy vegetables that don’t look very good and cost more, but are better for the environment.”

But here’s one that seems to be an exception to that pattern. As our knowledge about what happens below the surface of our soils grows (pun intended!) at an exponential pace, Regenerative Agriculture holds the prospect of: 1) growing as much or more food, 2) using less water, 3) needing far less fuel like diesel for tractors, 4) demanding less chemical input like herbicides, pesticides and non-renewable fertilizers, 5) being healthier for the farmer, the consumer and the environment, 6) sequestering carbon in meaningful amounts that some say could even REVERSE climate change, and 7) MOST IMPORTANT, can be MORE PROFITABLE for the farmers and no more expensive for the consumer. Not only that, but when done well, it can even include animals, like livestock and poultry, making meat no longer the bad guy, but a key contributor to the complete cycle!

What is Regenerative Agriculture? Basically, it means shifting our thinking about agriculture from what’s happening above ground, to what’s happening below. The fundamental shift is to stop seeing soil as simply an inert medium that holds certain chemicals for plants... (More)

Discussion

From the Valley Food Partnership.

Are you a beginning farmer or rancher? Trying to figure out the best way to market your products? Wondering where to even begin?

Join us Friday, November 4th 6:30-8:30 for an evening panel to discover & decide the best market channels for your farm business. Six panelists from local farm businesses and institutions along the Western Slope will share their tips and tricks. Learn from and connect with experts in the field, whether you are selling directly to consumers, through regional distributors, or even to institutions!

Please pre-register to attend: https://forms.gle/NnKi2V3neUBxwziC6!

Visit VFP's website for updated details.

Come prepared with questions for the panelists and meet other farmers and ranchers in the community!

Thanks to Farm Runners , @westernheritagefarms, The Yurtstead , @WagsWorldOrchard, Rocky Mountain Farmers Union!

Discussion

It's sweet corn time!

You probably caught the past few front pages, featuring the famous "Olathe Sweet" sweet corn, brought to you by local farmers and migrant workers.

John Harold and crew at Tuxedo Corn will be getting an estimated 500,000 to 600,000 cases of the sweet stuff into grocery stores and other vendors nationwide — as well as providing the signature fare for the annual Olathe Corn Festival.

Yes! The corn festival coming back, and for the 30th year. The fun starts at 10 a.m. Aug. 6 with a parade in downtown Olathe. Check out the details here.

I want to thank Joseph Harold for getting up bright and early this past Sunday and taking the harvest pictures for us. Joe, John Harold's son, is a go-getting young man who has helped the Daily Press immensely over the past several years. Thanks, Joe!

I also want to give a shout-out to William Woody, whose harvest photos (and story) were recently published in The Colorado Sun. William is a longtime Montrose resident, a former Daily Press photographer. When William isn't capturing the world through his lens, he is busy as the city's public information officer. Keep it up, William!

Finally, I need to recognize the farm laborers who provide America with food year-round, not just during corn season.

Once, several years ago, I tried my hand at picking corn in one of John's fields. I was determined that I could do it; thought that although other Americans who showed up to work almost... (More)

Cassie replied a year ago
Discussion

Interested in BLM's work in bat monitoring and conservation? I'll provide updates as I sit in on Wildlife Biologist Emily Latta's talk.

You can join here: https://westernslopeconservation.org/speakerseries/

There are no current endangered bat species, but bats do face threats fueled by climate change and White Nose Syndrome (just to start). WNS has killed roughly 6 million bats to date.

Bats on the sensitivity/threatened (likely to soon become endangered) list:

Townsends Big-eared Bat
Townsends Big-eared Bat

 

Fringed Myotis
Fringed Myotis

Spotted bats (Colorado's rarest bat)- there were two observations recently! One was around Montrose and another was near Hotchkiss. Latta noted this was an exciting sighting for BLM workers.

Spotted bat
Spotted bat

 

Allen's lappet-browed bat
Allen's lappet-browed bat

 

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